Category Archives: New Release

Films that are either to be released in the upcoming days or weeks or had already been released not long ago

I’m Cuckoo for Coco

I’ll try to make this my last post about Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop, the new documentary that follows Conan as he embarks on his Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Television Tour after his unceremonious departure from NBC and The Tonight Show. I tried getting tickets to this show almost immediately after it was announced, but it sold out quicker than I could say “Coco.” I’m anxiously awaiting this film’s release, as those who know me know I bleed Conan orange.

(Truthfully, I was looking for a reason to use this super awesome headline, and it all seemed to come together when I received the following opening day announcement. So here she is … )

After a much–publicized departure from hosting NBC’s Tonight Show, O’Brien hit the road with a 32-city music-and-comedy show to exercise his performing chops and exorcise a few demons. Filmmaker Rodman Flender’s documentary, Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop, is an intimate portrait of an artist trained in improvisation, captured at the most improvisational time of his career. It offers a window into the private writers room and rehearsal halls as O’Brien’s Legally Prohibited from Being Funny on Television Tour is almost instantly assembled and mounted to an adoring fan base. At times angry, mostly hilarious, we see a comic who does not stop—performing, singing, pushing his staff and himself. Did Conan O’Brien hit the road to give something back to his loyal fans, or did he travel across the continent, stopping at cities large and remote to fill a void within himself?

This film opens this Friday, June 24, at New York’s new Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center and Landmark Sunshine.

In Theatres: The Tree of Life

Fresh from the Cannes Film Festival and currently in select theatres is Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life. The film received a healthy mix of boos and applause at Cannes, but acclaimed filmmaker Malick had the last laugh when his film won the coveted Palme d’Or. Malick is one of those directors you keep your eye on. He doesn’t make films that often (a good 20 years between Days of Heaven and The Thin Red Line), but when he does, the epic productions usually pack a punch, usually in story and visuals.

I’ve been looking forward to The Tree of Life for a while now, as I’m a fan of Malick’s and Sean Penn’s and the film is being distributed by Fox Searchlight, my favorite distributor. The more I read about the film, the more the idea seems to fly over my head, so I’ll revert to the plot summary from Yahoo! Movies:

The impressionistic story of a Midwestern family in the 1950s following the life journey of the eldest son, Jack, through the innocence of childhood to his disillusioned adult years, as he tries to reconcile a complicated relationship with his father. Jack finds himself a lost soul in the modern world, seeking answers to the origins and meaning of life while questioning the existence of faith. Through Malick’’s signature imagery, we see how both brute nature and spiritual grace shape not only our lives as individuals and families, but all life.

Director: Terrence Malick

Screenwriter: Terrence Malick

Producers: Dede Gardner, Sarah Green, Grant Hill, Brad Pitt, Bill Pohlad

Cast: Brad Pitt, Sean Penn, Jessica Chastain, Fiona Shaw

Genre: Drama, Sci-Fi

Distributor: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Official Site: foxsearchlight.com/thetreeoflife

Runtime: 138 min.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw3QBALWa60&feature=fvst]

2011 Top 10 Indie Summer Flicks

(Re-posted from limitémagazine.com)

X-Men: First ClassSuper 8Green LanternTransformers: Dark of the MoonHarry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2Captain America: The First AvengerCowboys and AliensRise of the Planet of the ApesConan the Barbarian.

Now that that’s out of the way, let’s talk about the summer films that are on fewer people’s radars—the ones that won’t be #1 at the box office—yet, they’re primed to absorb some serious critical acclaim.

Last year, Limité launched its Top 10 Indie Summer Flicks as an alternate to all of the standard summer blockbusters. Many of those films went on to receive sparkling reviews and accolades, as well as Oscar nominations in several categories (including Best Picture, Best Documentary, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay, among others), so we kinda feel like we know what we’re talking about here.

We’re proud to present the second-annual summer film guide. Share your thoughts below by leaving a comment.

1. BEAUTIFUL BOY

by Daniel Quitério

Michael Sheen and Maria Bello play Bill and Kate, a married couple that learns its son committed a mass shooting at his university before taking his own life. The two struggle through the grief and confusion as the media spill into their lives. Beautiful Boy is the winner of the 2010 Toronto Film Festival International Critics’ Award.

This chilling film is reminiscent of last year’s Rabbit Hole with threads of 2005’s American Gun interwoven. Both Beautiful Boy and Rabbit Hole explore a couple’s relationship as it struggles over the death of a son. In Beautiful Boy, however, the stakes are higher, as that son is also responsible for taking the lives of several others, which is a subplot in the heavy-handed message film American Gun.

This film’s got “Oscar performances” written all over it for both Sheen and Bello, two highly underrated actors who have been aching for and deserving of that spotlight.

Director: Shawn Ku

Screenwriters: Michael Armbruster, Shawn Ku

Cast: Michael Sheen, Maria Bello, Alan Tudyk, Moon Bloodgood, Kyle Gallner, Meat Loaf

Distributor: Anchor Bay Films

Genre: Drama

Site: beautifulboythemovie.com

Release Date: June 3

Continue reading 2011 Top 10 Indie Summer Flicks

In Theatres: POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold

Morgan Spurlock, the Oscar-nominated director of Super Size Me (2004), brings his latest film to the big screen—a documentary about the commercialization of movies. This is of particular interest to me because I’ve long been interested in how advertising and film merge, having written my undergraduate thesis on product placement in film and working in the advertising industry (day job).

In POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold, Spurlock takes a comedic look at how advertising influences film, and he does it by breaking down the fourth wall to show how this very film succumbs to the influence (and paycheck) of marketers. The film opened on April 22 by Sony Pictures Classics.

Director: Morgan Spurlock

Screenwriters: Morgan Spurlock, Jeremy Chillnick

Producers: Jeremy Chillnick, Keith Calder, Jessica Wu, Morgan Spurlock

Cast: Morgan Spurlock

Genre: Documentary

Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics

Official Site: sonyclassics.com/greatestmovie

Runtime: 90 min.